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Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
Freddie Highmore

Freddie Highmore

Screen Time: 90%
Role: Charlie Bucket
Age: 12 years old
Jordan Fry

Jordan Fry

Screen Time: 30%
Role: Mike Teavee
Age: 11 years old
Julia Winter

Julia Winter

Screen Time: 25%
Role: Veruca Salt
Age: 11 years old
AnnaSophia Robb

AnnaSophia Robb

Screen Time: 20%
Role: Violet Beauregarde
Age: 11 years old
Philip Wiegratz

Philip Wiegratz

Screen Time: 15%
Role: Augustus Gloop
Age: 11 years old

 

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

2005
Rating: 8.75 (8 votes)
Directed: Tim Burton
Country: USA
Language: English
Genre: Adventure, Comedy, Family, Musical
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0367594

Summary

Charlie Bucket is a young boy who comes from a poor but loving family and would love nothing more than to find a golden ticket to enter the amazing chocolate factory run by inventor and owner Willy Wonka. As luck would have it, Charlie finds the last golden ticket and goes on this once-in-a-lifetime adventure with his grandpa Joe. Among the other four winners are Veruca Salt, a spoiled rich girl; Augustus Gloop, a gluttonous kid who stuffs his face with sweets; Violet Beuragarde, a champion trophy gum chewer; and Mike Teavee, a kid who spends more time watching TV and playing video games than anything else. Most fascinating is the mysterious Willy Wonka who in turn had a troubled childhood and has a special grand prize at the end for one of the kids. Also along the tour are Wonka's staff the singing, working Oommpa Loompas.

Movie Reviews

Director Tim Burton and Johnny Depp must have been like kids in a candy store, eagerly eyeing all the delectable confections of Roald Dahl's 1964 children's book and the original 1971 fantasy starring Gene Wilder. But instead of sampling the same-old safe, predictable flavors, the pair went on a sugar-fueled bender of creativity. Burton's fingerprints are all over the edgy humor and quirky look of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory." And Depp, already initiated to the seductive pleasures of "Chocolat," makes daring choices that give Willy Wonka a whole new, non-gooey center.

Fortunately, you won't need a Golden Ticket to enter one of the best family fun factories.

Screenwriter John August ("Big Fish") managed to stay faithful to Dahl's candy-land caper, while crafting a bittersweet social satire and delicious backstory for Willy Wonka. All the beloved characters -- some of whom you'll love to hate -- are back. Ordinary little Charlie Bucket (played by that sugar plum of a child actor, Freddy Highmore of "Finding Neverland") only gets one candy bar a year -- on his birthday. What does he do? He graciously shares it with his poverty-stricken, loving family (Helena Bonham Carter of "Big Fish" and Noah Taylor of the "Lara Croft" franchise play the parents).

So when Grandpa Joe (David Kelly of "Waking Ned Devine") mutters, "He's such a good boy, really," you can't help but nod your head in agreement. The other four Golden Ticket holders, who win entry to the closed Wonka factory and the chance to win a special prize, are deplorable brats: Augustus Gloop, Violet Beauregard, Veruca Salt and Mike Teavee hilariously personify the worst of today's overindulged, competitive children.

Depp's amazing chocolatier is weird-looking on the outside and a damaged child on the inside (thanks to Christopher Lee's chilling turn as Willie's dentist dad). One minute the eccentric grandly announces to his guests that everything in the chocolate-waterfall room can be eaten, and the next moment coyly adds, "I'm eatable, but that's called cannibalism." Clearly, Depp is not Gene Wilder's Willy Wonka.

A master of mise en scene, Burton layers his decor with detail upon detail until the visuals swirl in surreal flourishes. The world outside the factory seems snatched from the pages of Dickens' dreary "Bleak House." The inside is Technicolor eye candy. When squirrels test to see if Veruca is a bad nut or an Oompa-Loompa (Deep Roy) busts a few Bollywood-Busby Berkeley dance moves, the set pieces scream "Classic."

Wrapping food for thought in a sugarcoating, "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" is the Everlasting Gobstopper of Dahl adaptations.